Saturday, July 23, 2011

Amy Winehouse: Rehab and What You Must Know


Amy Winehouse is trending on Twitter because she is dead. Gutted, horrified, angry, sad, tragic .. the language of loss. A dozen songs or so that will live forever, while all hope for her is gone forever.

Addiction kills. It's ugly and the process of watching someone be at risk is painful. Sometimes, sometimes something stops it.

Sometimes it's just wasted words to say Get Help Now.

If you love someone, don't get into denial about the risks. Learn them, know them, deal with it. Sometimes it's as simple as taking the car keys or saying no to everything. Sometimes you can't stop them no matter what you do.

Get support. Not from your friends but from people who have walked in your shoes. Just do it so that someone you love will never trend on twitter because they're dead.

Al-Anon for you so you can do something good and maybe save some lives .... link.

17 comments:

  1. so hard to save someone

    requires believing that addiction kills

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  2. I'm not going to lie, with the exception of the song above, I rarely listened to Amy's music. Her death is completely shocking to me as I thought she was on the path to recovery.

    Such a young woman, with an amazing talent who got caught up in something stronger than her. It breaks my heart that a 27 year old,someone younger than me, has died, particularly in such preventable circumstances.

    I watched a person I love more than life get tangled up in drugs. First cannabis and then stronger substances. He went from sweet, gentle and perfect to a person I barely recognised, physically or mentally. My pain at watching him destroy his life and his potential turned to angry and resentment as time went on and the drugs had a stronger impact. Fortunately, my story ends well and though my family has never been the same since, he is is drug-free and better. My prayers are with Amy's family and those families struggling to help the people they love overcome the power of drugs.

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  3. Thank you for posting your thoughts. So many people feel helpless when someone they care about is in a dangerous place. An addicted person changes as you said, they will lie or steal, do unthinkable things. It's so hard to manage and Al-Anon meetings help deal with the feelings, the possible immediate actions required from the family and legal actions.

    It's horrible. The impaired judgment and the mad impulse that led Alexander McQueen to do the final act, the thing that can't be reversed.

    The pain of those left behind is forever.

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  5. http://fatscribe.com/2009/05/loves-me-some-jazz.html

    "Amy Winehouse has that just once in a lifetime original voice, with that northern soul vibe. Gawd, I hope she survives her own self and is around for decades to continue making amazing music and just enjoy her life. But, the music business and its successes has a lot of trappings and emptying disappointments, the likes of which so many Billie Holiday's and Janice Joplin's, Kurt Cobain's and Elliot Smith's can't steer clear of."

    I said that almost two years ago on FatScribe, and having lost my little brother (we're 18 mos. apart) to heroin, I know well this tragedy. And it is ... and no legalization of drugs will solve this problem. It's never worked in any country it's been tried. Only fools and knaves believe so (and even the smartest amongst can be foolish ...)

    thank you for your post. we all need friends like you to throw that wisdom out there for us.

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  6. The pain seeps through everything. Your loss is unthinkable and the helplessness. It's touched my life closely (no, not me, I've always had kids)
    and the absolute helplessness and fear.

    I'm very touched at your delicious language, odd words but true, and hurt by the knowledge you had of the risk.

    I don't know that there always is an answer. Thank you.

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  7. She was marketed and exploited by the media as the "junkie du jour", they made tons of money off her, magazines found her to be chic, English heroin chic, her own label promoted her as such .She was good for English PR. No No No I will not go to rehab became a chant for all... Yes , yes, yes, I am dying slowly , can't you see, should have been the chant ! We are now in a culture promoting death and destruction. Who's next ?

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  8. Ah truth. She looked so good, a wraith of heroin chic, tatted and wee dresses and a songbird who could break your heart. Amy and Janis and so many.

    I don't think anyone knows how to intercede, how to coldly with imperative stop what they can and make the drugging so damn difficult that you can fight back and save a life. It can't be done alone with feelings. One has to have counselors and people who have lived it and can get you through it.

    It touches all of us and the young gifted and beautiful haunt us. Thank you for your words. It's not supposed to be like this.

    Knowledge matters.

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  9. One another note, we have a show called " celebrity rehab" which has absolutely turned the word "rehab" into a joke. Celebrity ? who are those people? By the end of each show you wish the death of every single one of them . It's like "Grand Gignol ". Should we pay thousand of dollars to look like a junkie in withdrawal on Hollywood boulevard, making some designer rich so he can live in luxury in Paris. One has to be careful about the message.

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  10. Alas some designers too have had addictions that end their life, ruin their life, change their life.

    I hate the dealers. The dealers that tell the 13 yr old in middle school that if he sells some weed, pills, whatever, he can get his own free and make money too. Unspeakable.

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  11. I was shocked as well, as I thought too she was getting help.. so sad, so young, such amazing talent! they all have gone too young..Jim, Janis, Hendrix.. addiction kills, so true!

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  12. Addiction kills and humiliates. Hard to bear.

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  13. So well put, and thank you for the Al-Anon link, that organization has helped many people I have known over the years, it is a blessing the group exists.

    Like others I wasn't an enormous fan but very much appreciated her talent, which was obvious even to me. While not surprised, I am sad, having carried hopes she could overcome the demons.

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  15. I think the sad thing is that many people who followed her career weren't all too surprised that she ended up this way. Some even wondered why it didn't happen sooner. I remember reading an interview with her parents, where her father feared her death if she kept hanging out with her then-husband. There is a certain helplessness involved and while I remember being irritated that a concert of hers (which I was going to attend) ended up being cancelled because of her drug issues, I also wondered how those around her never found a way to intervene. I think most people think too narrowly about rehab being the only solution. It can just start with a conversation, therapy or a weekend getaway. The drugs were only an indicator of a problem - she clearly had trouble dealing with other aspects of her life.

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