Sunday, January 16, 2011

Ramiro Perez: Very Near The Spot That Kelly Cutrone Once Worked As A Tarot Card Reader












On a sunny day like today in Venice, very near the spot that Kelly Cutrone once worked as a tarot card reader and Jack Kerouac squatted in a flophouse, the boardwalk was packed. The man parading his three turtles in tiny glass houses, the woman with three young children strolling with a fierce green parrot posed on her shoulder and the man hawking the Freak Show, free for children under six, bald and sunburned were no more curious than the pelicans shrieking on the roofs on the honky tonk buildings.

Tables of cheesey 2.00 trinkets, henna tattoos, a different tarot card reader, a vendor with Banksy prints (photocopies from the internet) and then there was Ramiro Perez earnestly talking to women about the healing nature of a bracelet, a talisman. Hand wrought pieces of ordinary materials, nothing was precious or refined. Maybe it seems strange that my first thought was that his pieces would show so well against a  black Yohji Yamamoto dress and my second thought was the memory of discovering Herve Van Der Straetten twenty years ago in Paris: the language of craft that transcends the material.

Mr. Perez sits patiently on the boardwalk waiting for customers. He is bemused by me asking what shops he sold; he waves a hand and says he wouldn't like that. His work is not usual: these are artifacts  imbued with his gentleness, that he believes will empower the wearer. Talismans.

This is work to treasure and collect. I don't know whether Mr. Perez will sell at Colette in Paris, Brown's in London, Maxfield in West Hollywood or just under an umbrella at Venice Beach. I wish the photos captured the sensuality and importance of his work.

Actually, those necklaces would set up a Rick Owens dress perfectly.

The Way Of The Hand.

13 comments:

  1. They are beautiful and quite unique. It's true, talent is everywhere and in the least likely places sometimes. How is he priced?
    Cupcake

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  2. I'm walking back in a few minutes to try to take photos (the sun is so bright and the ocean - everything I tried to shoot myself yesterday was washed out) ... his most elaborate pieces are a heartbreaking 120 and many are so much less.

    These pieces have the patina of love and respect and time: in no way does the magic of his work show up here.

    Sending photos to Maxfield and someone else is sending this to Barneys.

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  3. This man could make a fortune with his talent. These are masterpieces of art.

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  4. This man is so special ... he is happy making his things and talking about a special place in the world.

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  5. That is so cool of you to promote his talent! $120 is robbery. Imagine the time!
    Cupcake

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  6. One by one ... found and ordinary objects. Raw talent gets found. Long ago Rick Owens couldn't afford the usual way of doing business: shops did the unthinkable (well, Charles Gallay anyway) and paid in advance so he could make the clothes.

    It's a wonderful world when the sun shines on raw talent.

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  7. HIs stuff is fabulous!! I"ll have to get down there to go see (and buy, I'm sure) myself!

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  8. Please do keep us posted of any developments in his career. A great story it would make!

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  9. He's bringing his good pieces to my house tomorrow evening and hoping I can get some good photos. It is a good story, hoping for a little magic for him.

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  10. I don't know what a flophouse is....but that first paragraph is divine. Wow.

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  11. Ah everyday, thank you. The Venice Boardwalk is similar to every other beach town's boardwalk - honky tonk and cheesey but oh that ocean - except that its steeped in lore. In the fifties into the sixties, its zenith, it was where Jim Morrison and all the Beat Poets came to drink, and more. There were old time rooms for rent - flophouses and squats - that they holed up in. It was black turtlenecks and mopey hair. The memory of the greatness of the past inhabits permeates the declasse touristy moments today, even with silly little girls bringing their false ID to the plethora of tattoo salons to have the very tired Chinese symbol inked on their young lower back and the truly nasty hawkers of medical marijuana yell that the doctor is in the house.

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  12. This is amazing sorry Im late to the post. I love big expressive necklaces. There were these vintage pieces I saw at a flea market of all places that were about circa 1920's is that remind me of this work. Thanks for sharing.

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